www.uncletony.co.uk

Amateur Radio Stuff


uncletony has held an Amateur Radio licence since 1964. He initially started operation with a UK Class 'B' licence and was a member of the Grafton Radio Society in Holloway, North London for several years.


Tony did a lot of home construction, mostly on the kitchen table, much to his mothers annoyance! His first transmitter was 100% home-brew - 10Watts of crystal-controlled output on 433-odd Mhz (8032 kHz x 72) from a QQV03-20 twin-tetrode valve, modulation was AM. It was awesome to have a QSO in the dark and watch the flickering blue electron beams in the KT-66 modulation valves. What a beast! Lots of volts, lots of heat...!!

While he was working in the Middle East he studied with ADMA radio operators for the 12 words-per-minute Morse code exam in Abu Dhabi. He eventually passed the test (March 14, 1969) and was granted a full licence (MP4Dxx).

Later uncletony was transferred to Bushire on the Iranian side of the Gulf. The Iranian authorities were not at all enthusiastic about issuing him a licence so, not wanting to attract considerable attention, Tony quietly shelved the idea of becoming an EP4...

old valved HF transmitter
This was the transceiver
used to make all uncletony's
MP4Dxx contacts


uncletony returned to the UK in 1980. Once settled he re-kindled his radio interests by getting on to the newly approved UK Citizens Band radio (27MHz/FM), using the 'handle' "GammaRay".

He joined the Aberdeen Amateur Radio Society (AARS) and eventually became one of the first candidates to sit and pass the Morse test administered by a local Radio Club.

He got his full Class A licence on November 6, 1986. Tony was a member of the AARS for many years (even becoming vice-president for one session).

As a keen constructor he won the Lamb Trophy a couple of times for the quality and complexity of home-brew projects. He has converted several FM and multi-mode CB's for use on the Amateur 10 metre band.

Tony has also 'had a go' at many facets of amateur radio hobby - HF, VHF and UHF bands and AM, FM, TV, Morse (CW), RTTY and Packet (AX-25) modes. He has even had a confirmed contact from the MIR space-station!

These days you'll find uncletony mostly Mobile on S-22 (145.550Mhz) during weekday morning and evening rush hours in the Aberdeen area.

 

CB approval logo


Major Amateur Radio Organisations

IARU logo ARRL logo RSGB logo
International Amateur Radio Union American Amateur Radio League Radio Society of Great Britain

 

Links to very useful sites

Link to QRZ.com website

Link to mods.dk
Probably the best site in the world
for information on modifying your rig

Link to WinLog site

Go here for G0CUZ's FREE
Log Book program.
     

 

Useful and Interesting Radio Stuff

Conversion dBW - Watts

dBW
Watts
dBW
Watts
dBW
Watts
-20
0.01
1
1.259
14
25.12
-15
0.032
2
1.585
15
31.62
-10
0.1
3
1.995
16
39.81
-9
0.126
4
2.512
17
50.12
-8
0.158
5
3.162
18
63.10
-7
0.200
6
3.981
19
79.43
-6
0.251
7
5.012
20
100.00
-5
0.316
8
6.13
21
125.89
-4
0.398
9
7.94
22
158.49
-3
0.501
10
10.00
23
199.53
-2
0.631
11
12.59
24
251.19
-1
0.794
12
15.85
25
316.23
0
1.00
13
19.95
26
398.11

 

RF Frequency (ƒ) and Wavelength (λ)

 Frequency (ƒ) in kHz
=
 300,000 / Wavelength (λ) in Meters
 Frequency (ƒ) in MHz
=
 300 / Wavelength (λ) in Meters
 Frequency (ƒ) in MHz
=
 984 / Wavelength (λ) in Feet
 Wavelength (λ) in Meters
=
 300,000 / Frequency (ƒ) in kHz
 Wavelength (λ) in Meters
=
 300 / Frequency (ƒ) in MHz
 Wavelength (λ) in Feet
=
 984 / Frequency(ƒ) in MHz

 

Speed/Velocity of Radio Waves

300,000 meters (or 186,000 feet) per second

 

Useful Links to Radio allied sites

For an easy-to-read explanation on radio wave propagation go here.

Interested in aurora ? Go here. You can sign up for automatic email alerts when a geomagnetic storm is starting (which indicates a high chance of amateur radio auroral activity and possibly visua aurora borealis displays in the UK).
Also, visit this site in Alaska which is experimenting with auroral predictions.

Record Keeping
It is a legal requirement that a record of all 'contacts' between amateur radio stations - usually called the 'Log Book'. For a FREE computer based Log Book visit the web-site of G0CUZ, and download 'WinLog32'. In addition to being a formal contact record it allows quick cross-reference between countries, states, counties, date, time, frequency band, maps, etc.

 

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