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Cables and Connectors

This section is constantly updated......      It will eventually bring you even more useful information.....

On this page are drawings and circuits of commonly used interconnecting cables used for TV and Video and computers.
Please e-mail me with corrections, suggestions and/or additions



SCART

 

scart connector

SCART (Peritel) Connector

 

 

 

 

 

 


SCART (Peritel) Connector - Pin assignments
Pin 1 - Audio Out (RH) Pin 11 - Green In
Pin 2 - Audio In (RH) Pin 12 - Data Line 1
Pin 3 - Audio Out (LH) Pin 13 - Red Ground
Pin 4 - Audio Ground Pin 14 - Blanking Ground
Pin 5 - Blue Ground Pin 15 - Red In
Pin 6 - Audio In (LH) Pin 16 - Blanking (Hi = RGB, Lo = Composite)
Pin 7 - Blue In Pin 17 - Video In/Out Ground
Pin 8 - AV Function Switching* Pin 18 - Video In Ground
Pin 9 - Green Ground Pin 19 - Video Out
Pin 10 - Data Line 2 Pin 20 - Video In
Pin 21 - Common, Ground, Shield

* Modern TV's have 3 switching levels for Pin 8 Function
Low - (0V - 2V): TV Mode
Mid - (5V to 8V): Widescreen Mode
High - (9.5 - 12v): AV Mode


S-VHS connections on SCART Lead
Pin 15 - Chrominance (C)
Pin 17 - Grounds (for Y and C)
Pin 20 - Luminance (Y)

 

uncletony's Tip:
Do you see ghostly images floating 'behind' the main picture when watching your satellite, DVD or VCR?

Chances are it is caused by crosstalk on the SCART lead.

Try disconnecting the wire on Pin 19 - at the TV end.

The technical explanation:- Most TV's send a signal out on Pin 19 even when in AV-mode.
This often crosstalks onto the signal coming from VCR, DVD, etc, going in to the TV on Pin 20.

 

S-VHS (Mini-DIN)

 

s-video connector
View from solder terminals


S-VHS (Mini-DIN) connections
Pin 1 - Ground (Luminance (Y))
Pin 2 - Ground (Chrominance (C))
Pin 3 - Luminance input (including sync)
Pin 4 - Chrominance input

The S-Video connection system separates the Luminance (Y, or brightness) and Chrominance (C, or colour) signals from each other.
The result is a higher definition picture with none of the 'fuzzy' effects that are often seen on TV pictures containing lots of narrow stripes (eg crawling dots on the vertical edges of a highly coloured area and cross-colour strobing on tweed jackets, etc).

S-VHS connections can also be made using a SCART lead (see Scart, above)

 

Null Modem Cable (9-pin)

 

 

 

null-modem cable
View from solder terminals


Update information for your satellite TV receiver is often available on the internet.

The connection cable between your computer and the satellite receiver is usually made with null-modem cable.

Null-Modem (RS-232) Cable
Pin 1
Not Connected
Pin 1
Pin 2
TXD-RXD
Pin 3
Pin 3
Pin 2
Pin 4
Not Connected
Pin 4
Pin 5
Ground
Pin 5
Pin 6
Not Connected
Pin 6
Pin 7
CTS-RTS
Pin 8
Pin 8
Pin 7
Pin 9
Not Connected
Pin 9

 

RF Connector Information


BNC plug
BNC

 

TNC plug
TNC

 

 

N-type plug
N-Type

 

UHF (PL259) plug and cable reducer
UHF (PL 259)
with reducer

 

TV (Euro) plug
TV (Euro) Plug

F-type plug
F-type

SMA plug
SMA

SMB plug
SMB

Sizes are not to scale but are relative to each other.

Cable entry is on the right side of all the connectors shown.


BNC (Bayonet Neill Concelman)
Invented in the late 1940's by, and named after, Bell Labs Engineer Paul Neill and Amphenol Engineer Carl Concelman.
A coaxial connector with bayonet coupling mechanism. This connector is available in 50 Ohm and 75 Ohm versions. This connector has a frequency range upto 4 GHz (50 Ohm version) and upto 1 GHz (75 Ohm version). Alternatively referred to as British Naval Connector or Bayonet Nut Connector.

TNC (Threaded Neill Concelman)
Invented by and named after Amphenol Engineer Carl Concelman and Bell Labs Engineer Paul Neill and was developed in the late 1950's.
This coaxial connector with a screw type coupling mechanism was designed to reduce electrical noise which was problematic with BNC's under extreme vibrations. This connector is available in 50 Ohm and 75 Ohm versions. This connector has a frequency range of upto 11 GHz (50 Ohm version) and upto 1 GHz (75 Ohm version).

Type N (Neill)
The first connector capable of microwave performance. Invented by and named after Bell Labs Engineer Paul Neill and was developed in the 1940's.
A coaxial connector with screw type coupling mechanism. This connector is available in 50 Ohm and 75 Ohm versions. This connector has a frequency range upto 11 GHz (50 Ohm version) and upto 1 GHz (75 Ohm version). The Type N connector is available in Standard N (For Coaxial Cable) and Helical N, or "HN", (For Corrugated Cable) configurations.

UHF (Ultra High Frequency) Type
Invented by Amphenol Engineer E. Clark Quackenbush and was developed in the 1930's for use in the radio industry.
A coaxial connector with screw type coupling mechanism. The plug is often referred by its' military part number, PL259. The connector has a non-constant impedance. This is a general purpose connector developed for use up to a maximum frequency of about 300 MHz. When used with small daimeter coaxial cable a reducer is available.

TV (Euro) Type
Connector mainly used in the television industry, impedance is between 60 and 75 Ohms. Alternatively referred to as PAL, IEC, Belling-Lee, TV co-ax plug.

F Type
A low-cost connector designed for satellite TV, cable TV, and MATV applications. When terminated the centre conductor of the coaxial cable becomes the centre connection of the plug. Frequency range upto 2GHz.

SMA (Subminiature Version A)
A subminiature coaxial connector with screw type coupling mechanism. This connector was developed in the 1960's and has a 50 Ohm impedance. This connector has a frequency range upto to 18 GHz.

SMB (Subminiature Version B)
A subminiature coaxial connector with snap-on quick release mechanism. This connector is available in 50 Ohm and 75 Ohm versions. The 50 Ohm version has a frequency range upto to 4 GHz.

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